Posts Tagged ‘Jeffrey Sedgwick’
Wednesday, February 3rd, 2010

The Senate Judiciary Committee will consider President Obama’s pick to lead the Justice Department’s Bureau of Justice Statistics at its meeting Thursday, according to the panel’s Web site.

James P. Lynch (City University of New York)

BJS nominee James P. Lynch was tapped for the post on Oct. 29. He is a criminal justice professor at John Jay College at the City University of New York. He also serves as the American Society of Criminology’s vice president-elect.

Lynch told panel members at a confirmation hearing last month that he would ensure that the statistical body was independent and free from political manipulation. He sat on a National Research Council panel that recommended last July that the BJS become independent of the Office of Justice Programs in the DOJ hierarchy to avoid political pressures. Read the National Research Council report, which was sponsored by the DOJ, here.

Read more about Lynch here and read information the committee received about him here.

If confirmed, he would replace acting director Michael Sinclair. Lynch would be the first presidentially appointed bureau director since Jeffrey Sedgwick resigned in 2008 to lead the Office of Justice Programs.

The panel is also scheduled to vote on DOJ nominees Dawn Johnsen (to head the Office of Legal Counsel), Mary L. Smith (to lead the Tax Division) and Christopher Schroeder (to head the Office of Legal Policy) during its business meeting tomorrow. Their nominations were held over from last week.

Wednesday, January 20th, 2010

James P. Lynch, President Barack Obama’s pick to lead the Justice Department’s Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) told members of the Senate Judiciary Committee today that, if confirmed, he would ensure that the statistical body was independent and free from political manipulation.

James P. Lynch (City University of New York)

The bureau, which serves as a clearinghouse for crime and criminal justice statistics, came under scrutiny in 2005, when its director, Lawrence A. Greenfeld, was allegedly demoted after he complained about a decision by the Justice Department to play down statistics on the hostile police handling of black and Hispanic drivers. Read the New York Times article on the dismissal here.

Lynch sat on a National Research Council panel that recommended last July that the BJS become independent of the Office of Justice Programs in the DOJ hierarchy to avoid political pressures. Read the National Research Council report, which was sponsored by the DOJ, here.

Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.), the ranking Republican on the Judiciary panel, said he didn’t support the recommendations. He said putting the BJS directly under the Attorney General and Deputy Attorney General would not help keep politics out of the bureau.

“The more you get prominent, the more you get politicized,” Sessions said at the nomination hearing.

Lynch said at the hearing that he would make certain that the bureau can be trusted. “The way you do that is the same way you always do that: You provide accurate, timely and useful data,” the nominee said.

Obama tapped Lynch for the post on Oct. 29. He is a criminal justice professor at John Jay College at the City University of New York. He also serves as the American Society of Criminology’s vice president-elect. He has published numerous articles and books on criminal justice statistics.

If confirmed, he would replace acting director Michael Sinclair. Lynch would be the first presidentially appointed bureau director since Jeffrey Sedgwick resigned in 2008 to lead the Office of Justice Programs.

Read more about Lynch here and read information the committee received about him here.

Sunday, January 17th, 2010

The Senate Judiciary Committee will hold a hearing on Wednesday for President Barack Obama’s nominee to lead the Justice Department Bureau of Justice Statistics, according to the Senate Judiciary Committee Web site.

James P. Lynch (City University of New York)

Obama tapped James P. Lynch for the post on October 29. He is a criminal justice professor at John Jay College at the City University of New York. He also serves as the American Society of Criminology vice president-elect. He has published numerous articles and books on criminal justice statistics.

Read more about Lynch here and read information the committee received about him here.

He would replace acting director Michael Sinclair. Lynch would be the first presidentially appointed bureau director since Jeffrey Sedgwick resigned in 2008 to lead the DOJ Office of Justice Programs

Thursday, November 5th, 2009

The Senate confirmed four Justice Department officials by unanimous consent tonight.

They are:

Laurie O. Robinson (DOJ)

Laurie O. Robinson (DOJ)

-Laurie O. Robinson (Office of Justice Programs Assistant Attorney General): The OJP Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General and former office chief will succeed Bush OJP head Jeffrey Sedgwick, who resigned in January. She was nominated Sept. 14. Read our previous report on Robinson here.

Carmen Ortiz (Adelphi Univ.)

Carmen Ortiz (Adelphi Univ.)

-Carmen M. Ortiz (Massachusetts U.S. Attorney): The Massachusetts Assistant U.S. Attorney will replace Michael J. Sullivan, who stepped down in April to join a law firm headed by former Attorney General John Ashcroft. Read more about Ortiz here.

Ed Tarver (Tarverforgeorgiasenate.com)

Ed Tarver (Tarverforgeorgiasenate.com)

-Ed Tarver (Southern District of Georgia U.S. Attorney): The Georgia state senator and partner at Augusta, Ga., law firm Hull, Towill, Norman, Barrett & Salley will succeed Edmund A. Booth Jr., who resigned earlier this month. Read more about Tarver here.

-Benjamin Wagner (Eastern District of California U.S. Attorney): The Assistant U.S. Attorney will succeed McGregor Scott, who resigned in January. Wagner was nominated Aug. 6. Read more about Wagner here.

The Senate has now confirmed 21 U.S. Attorneys. The chamber must still consider three more U.S. Attorney nominees that were reported out of committee today.

Robinson is the second Assistant Attorney General to be confirmed today. The Senate confirmed Ignacia Moreno as the next Assistant Attorney General for the Environment and Natural Resources Division earlier this evening. There are three more Assistant Attorney General nominees waiting for confirmation in the Senate, including long-stalled Dawn Johnsen for the Office of Legal Counsel.

Thursday, October 29th, 2009

President Obama intends to tap a criminal justice professor as the next Bureau of Justice Statistics director, the White House announced today.

James P. Lynch (City University of New York)

James P. Lynch (City University of New York)

James P. Lynch is a criminal justice professor at John Jay College at the City University of New York. He also serves as the American Society of Criminology vice president-elect. He has published numerous articles and books on criminal justice statistics. Read more about him here.

He would replace acting director Michael Sinclair. Lynch would be the first presidentially appointed bureau director since Jeffrey Sedgwick resigned in 2008 to lead the Office of Justice Programs. The statistics bureau is part of the Justice Department.

Thursday, October 22nd, 2009

The Senate Judiciary Committee approved two Justice Department nominees at its business meeting this morning by unanimous consent.

They are:

Laurie O. Robinson (DOJ)

Laurie O. Robinson (DOJ)

-Laurie O. Robinson (Office of Justice Programs Assistant Attorney General): The OJP Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General and former office chief would succeed Bush OJP head Jeffrey Sedgwick, who resigned in January. She was nominated Sept. 14. Her confirmation hearing was Oct. 7. Read our previous report on the nominee here.

-Benjamin Wagner (Eastern District of California U.S. Attorney): The Assistant U.S. Attorney would succeed McGregor Scott, who resigned in January. Wagner was nominated Aug. 6. Read more about the nominee here.

The panel has now approved 19 U.S. Attorneys, including the 18 U.S. Attorneys who have been confirmed by the Senate. There are another 11 U.S. Attorney nominees who have not been considered by the committee yet.

Robinson was the last Assistant Attorney General nominee to come before the panel. She joins four Assistant Attorney General nominees, who are waiting for confirmation in the Senate.

Monday, October 19th, 2009

The Senate Judiciary Committee is slated to consider two Justice Department nominees at its business meeting Thursday.

They are:

Laurie O. Robinson (DOJ)

Laurie O. Robinson (DOJ)

-Laurie O. Robinson (Office of Justice Programs Assistant Attorney General): The OJP Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General and former office chief would succeed Bush OJP head Jeffrey Sedgwick, who resigned in January. She was nominated Sept. 14. Her confirmation hearing was Oct. 7. Read our previous report on the nominee here.

-Benjamin Wagner (Eastern District of California U.S. Attorney): The Assistant U.S. Attorney would succeed McGregor Scott, who resigned in January. Wagner was nominated Aug. 6. Read more about the nominee here.

After Wagner, the panel has another 11 more U.S. Attorney nominees who are queued up and ready to go. Robinson is the last Assistant Attorney General nominee to come before the committee.

Wednesday, October 7th, 2009

The Office of Justice Programs nominee told a Senate panel today that she would make sure Justice Department grant money is used effectively if the Senate confirms her.

Laurie O. Robinson (DOJ)

Laurie O. Robinson (DOJ)

Laurie O. Robinson said during the question and answer portion of a Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing that Justice Department officials must be “good stewards” of the billions of taxpayer dollars that OJP allocates to state, local and tribal law enforcement agencies.

“It is imperative that there be a system of internal controls and strong accountability to guard against waste, fraud and abuse,” Robinson said in her written testimony. “Building on my prior experience, this will be one of my highest priorities if confirmed, working closely with the Justice Department’s Office of Inspector General.”

The OJP nominee said in her written testimony that she would also make a “What Works Clearinghouse” of summarized Justice Department research available to state, local and tribal law enforcement agencies to ensure that taxpayer money is going towards effective programs.

Robinson, who is currently OJP Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General, was OJP Acting Assistant Attorney General from January until her nomination in September.

She previously served as the OJP Assistant Attorney General during the Clinton administration. During her leadership from 1993 to 2000, the annual appropriations for the office grew from $800 million to more than $4 billion, according to her biography.

Panel Democrats — including Sens. Ben Cardin (Md.), Arlen Specter (Pa.) and Patrick Leahy (Vt.) — praised Robinson for her past service. ”You bring a wealth of experience to this position,” said Cardin, who chaired the hearing.

Robinson would succeed Bush OJP head Jeffrey Sedgwick, who resigned in January.

Read more about Robinson here.

Wednesday, September 30th, 2009

President Obama’s pick to lead the Office of Justice Programs is slated to appear before the Senate Judiciary Committee Oct. 7 for a confirmation hearing, the panel announced today.

Laurie O. Robinson (DOJ)

Laurie O. Robinson (DOJ)

Laurie O. Robinson was tapped for the post Sept. 14. She was named OJP Acting Assistant Attorney General in January and served in that capacity until her nomination. Robinson became Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General after her nomination because she cannot be a nominee and serve in an acting position at the same time.

She previously served as the OJP Assistant Attorney General from 1993 to 2000. During her tenure as President Clinton’s OJP chief, the annual appropriations for the office grew from $800 million to more than $4 billion, according to her biography.

Robinson would succeed Bush OJP head Jeffrey Sedgwick, who resigned in January.

Read more about Robinson here.

Friday, September 18th, 2009

Laurie O. Robinson (DOJ)

Laurie O. Robinson (DOJ)

Laurie O. Robinson (Brown University) is nominated to be Assistant Attorney General of the Office of Justice Programs. If confirmed, Robinson — who is not a lawyer — would replace Bush administration OJP head Jeffrey Sedgwick, who resigned in January.

Her vitals:

  • Born in Washington, D.C., in 1946.
  • Has been Deputy Assistant Attorney General for OJP since Sept. 14.
  • Was the Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General and Acting Assistant Attorney General for OJP from January until earlier this month.
  • Worked as a distinguished senior scholar/director of the criminology department in the master’s program at the University of Pennsylvania from 2001 until January.
  • Was a consultant to Pew Charitable Trusts from May 2008 to August 2008.
  • Served as a consultant to Abt Associates in Cambridge, Mass., from February 2004 to August 2004.
  • Worked as a consultant to the Council of State Governments in Lexington, Ky., from August 2003 to June 2004.
  • Was a consultant to Justice Management Institute in Denver, Colo., from January 2003 to July 2005.
  • Worked as the president of CSR Incorporated in Arlington, Va., from January 2003 to August 2003.
  • Served as the Assistant Attorney General for OJP from September 1994 to February 2000.
  • Was the Associate Deputy Attorney General and Assistant Attorney General from August 1993 to September 1994.
  • Worked as the director of the criminal justice section at the American Bar Association from September 1979 to August 1993. Also headed the association’s professional services division.
  • Served as the assistant staff director at the criminal justice section at the American Bar Association from July 1972 to August 1979.
  • Was a temporary administrative assistant at Potomac Temporaries in Alexandria, Va., from April 1972 to July 1972.
  • Worked as a desk editor and reporter at the Community News Service in New York, N.Y., from September 1968 to July 1971.
  • Received the Edmond J. Randolph Award at the Justice Department for Outstanding Service.

Click here for her full questionnaire.