Posts Tagged ‘Yahoo’
Wednesday, March 3rd, 2010

In contrast to Microsoft Corp.’s recent pronouncements, Yahoo! Inc.’s chief executive Carol Bartz told reporters yesterday that she didn’t think her company needed to talk to regulators about Google’s search tactics.

Carol Bartz (Yahoo)

Microsoft and several small search engines have complained to U.S. and European authorities about Google’s search ranking, accusing the search giant of punishing potential rivals by pushing them down in search results.

“I think for the most part the markets work and I’d rather be competitive in the market,” Bartz said at a lunch celebrating Yahoo’s 15th anniversary, according to Reuters.

Yahoo won antitrust approval last month  for its advertising pact with Microsoft, wherein Microsoft’s Bing will handle search for both companies and Yahoo will focus on ad sales. Yahoo previously dropped a similar pact with Google after the Justice Department threatened to block it.

The Federal Trade Commission is currently reviewing another Google deal: it’s proposed purchase of mobile advertising firm AdMob. According to Reuters, Bartz said that Yahoo did not reach out to the FTC to discuss the Google-AdMob deal but “may have been asked” about it by regulators.

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Thursday, February 18th, 2010

Microsoft Corp. and Yahoo! Inc. received approval for their advertising pact from both the Justice Department and the European Commission today, the companies announced.

Main Justice reported earlier today the Justice Department had closed its investigation into the deal and was set to approve it. Through a listing provided by the Federal Trade Commission this afternoon, the DOJ also said it signed off on the deal.

The partnership was announced last July, but the details took several more months to work out. Under the terms of the agreement, Microsoft’s Bing will be the search engine for Yahoo sites, and Yahoo will handle search advertising sales for both companies.

The deal has been through several iterations. It began in January 2008, when Microsoft announced a $44.6 billion hostile bid for Yahoo. Yahoo rejected the bid and struck a search partnership with Google, but the Justice Department threatened to block the deal in November 2008 and the companies abandoned it.

The less formal alliance between Microsoft and Yahoo is an attempt to build a viable competitor to the Google search juggernaut.

In its investigation into the Google-Yahoo deal, the Justice Department found that Google had more than 70 percent of the market in both Internet search advertising and in the market for handling searches on other Web sites.

In assessing whether the Microsoft-Yahoo pact raises antitrust concerns, regulators look both at the structure of the whole market, which Google dominates, and also at what competition between the two companies the deal would eliminate.

In clearing the deal without conditions, the Justice Department concluded that the parties don’t compete head-to-head much either for advertisers, or for publishers that use search engines on their own sites.

“Most customers view Google as posing the most significant competitive constraint on both Microsoft and Yahoo!, and the competitive focus of both Microsoft and Yahoo! is predominately on Google and not on each other,” the Justice Department said in a statement announcing its decision.

According to a person familiar with the investigation, the Justice Department’s Antitrust Division had largely signed off on the matter several months ago, before Microsoft and Yahoo filed their formal paperwork on the deal. The notice released today by the FTC signals that Justice officials approved the pact without opening an extended review after the companies sought formal approval.

updated at 6:35 p.m.

Thursday, February 18th, 2010

According to a person familiar with the matter, the Justice Department has closed its investigation into an advertising pact between Microsoft Corp. and Yahoo! Inc. and will approve the deal shortly.

The European Union approved the deal, without conditions, earlier today.

The partnership was announced last July, but the details took several more months to work out. Under the terms of the agreement, Microsoft’s Bing will be the search engine for Yahoo sites.

The deal has been through several iterations. It began in January 2008, when Microsoft announced a $44.6 billion hostile bid for Yahoo. Yahoo rejected the bid and struck a search partnership with Google, but the Justice Department threatened to block the deal in November 2008 and the companies abandoned it.

The less formal alliance between Microsoft and Yahoo is an attempt to build a viable competitor to the Google search juggernaut.

In its investigation into the Google-Yahoo deal, the Justice Department found that Google had more than 70% of the market in both Internet search advertising and in the market for handling searches on other web sites.

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Wednesday, June 3rd, 2009

The Justice Department has launched an investigation into whether hiring practices by major technology firms violated antitrust laws, reports the Washington Post.  The investigation is targeting Google, Yahoo, Apple, and many other firms.

The investigation is trying to determine if companies in the technology industry made an agreement with one another to not recruit each others employees.  The Department has issued civil investigative demands to get documents and information from the companies, but the investigation is in its early stages.

Fun fact: The New York Times notes that, in 2001, Supreme Court nominee Sonia Sotomayor ruled against Exxon and other oil companies for colluding in hiring decisions to suppress wages.

UPDATE: The WSJ Law Blog’s headline for the story is: “Breaking News: DOJ Trusbusters Probing Big Tech’s Hiring Practices” while technology blog TechCrunch goes with “Once Again, the Justice Department Is Confused. Tech Companies Steal Employees From Each Other Every Day.”

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