Posts Tagged ‘U.S. Commission on Civil Rights’
Thursday, January 27th, 2011

President Barack Obama will put two Democrats on the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, narrowing the conservative majority on an independent government panel that has been a headache for Attorney General Eric Holder.

Roberta Achtenberg (The California State University)

Obama announced on Wednesday that he will appoint a National Center for Lesbian Rights co-founder, Roberta Achtenberg, and consultant Marty Castro to the fact-finding commission. (Read more about the Democrats here.) Achtenberg and Castro will bring the number of Democrats on the panel to three and leave conservatives with only a one-member majority.

The Democrats replace Chairman Gerald Reynolds and Commissioner Ashley Taylor Jr., both Republicans, whose terms on the panel expired in December. The former commissioners were among the conservatives who voted in favor of a commission report that was extremely critical of the Justice Department’s handling of a voter-intimidation case involving members of the New Black Panther Party.

Marty Castro (The Chicago Community Trust)

With Achtenberg and Castro, the panel will have seven commissioners — one member short of a full commission. The panel will have an equal number of Democrats and conservatives if one more Democrat is appointed to fill the remaining vacancy on the panel.

The House speaker will fill that vacancy upon the recommendation of the House minority leader. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) recommended that Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) reappoint Michael Yaki, a Democrat whose term expired late last month, a Democrat familiar with Pelosi’s recommendation told Main Justice. But Boehner hasn’t made the reappointment.

The president, House speaker and Senate president pro tempore each make appointments to the commission. Four of the commissioners are presidential appointees, two are Senate appointees and two are House appointees.

The president also gets to designate a chairman and vice chairman from among the commissioners if one of those posts is vacant. The majority of the panel must back any of his picks. Obama has yet to name the new chairman. The vice chairman, who is Republican Abigail Thernstrom, holds the chairmanship until the president designates a new chairman.

But the president, House speaker and Senate president pro tempore do not have the opportunity to make all of their appointments at the same time because the commissioners’ six-year terms are staggered.

The commission can have up to four members of the same political affiliation. But the two House appointees cannot come from the same party, and the two Senate appointees cannot share the same political affiliation.

Achtenberg and Castro will be Obama’s first appointments to the commission, which has been under conservative control since the administration of President George W. Bush. Four Republicans and two right-leaning independents have sat on the panel for most of the last seven years, leaving only two spots for Democrats until the terms of Reynolds and Taylor expired in December. And under the power of the conservatives, the commission has been a thorn in the side of the Obama DOJ.

The commission spent most of the last two years investigating the voter-intimidation case against members of the New Black Panther Party. The report approved by the commission in November says the DOJ did not adequately assist the panel with its investigation of the DOJ’s decision to dismiss most charges against members of the anti-white fringe group who wore military clothing as they stood outside a polling place in a black Philadelphia neighborhood in November 2008.

The DOJ has denied any wrongdoing in the case and rejected claims that it didn’t cooperate with the commission, which spent more than $170,000 probing the DOJ’s decisions in the case.

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Lamar Smith (R-Texas) and other Republican members of Congress also have expressed concerns about the DOJ’s handling of the case. But House Republicans have not indicated whether they will look into the matter during this Congress.

Wednesday, November 24th, 2010

The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights on Wednesday officially released a report highly critical of the Justice Department’s assistance with the commission’s investigation into a controversial voter-intimidation case against members of the New Black Panther Party.

Race Neutral Enforcement of the Law? DOJ and the New Black Panther Party Litigation An Interim Report,” which the conservative-led commission approved last week, contains the same major complaints about the DOJ as an earlier draft of the body’s report leaked last month.

The report says the DOJ’s “lack of cooperation” raises questions about the government’s decision to dismiss most charges against members of the anti-white fringe group who wore military clothing as they stood outside a polling place in a black Philadelphia neighborhood in November 2008. The document says the department did not completely address “serious accusations” made by former DOJ staffer J. Christian Adams and Assistant U.S. Attorney Christopher Coates, the former chief of the Civil Rights Division Voting Section, about opposition in the DOJ to taking up voting rights cases against minorities.

“[T]he record of communications within the Department appears to indicate that senior political appointees played a significant role in the decision making surrounding the lawsuit,” the report says. “The involvement of senior DOJ officials by itself would not be unusual, but the Department’s repeated attempts to obscure the nature of their involvement and other refusals to cooperate raise questions about what the Department is trying to hide.”

A DOJ spokeswoman did not immediately respond to a request for comment. But the department previously has denied any wrongdoing in the case and rejected accusations of a lack of cooperation with the commission.

Assistant Attorney General Thomas Perez said in a statement before the commission earlier this year that the Civil Rights Division is “strongly committed” to enforcing voting rights laws. DOJ spokeswoman Tracy Schmaler also has said the department turned over more than 4,000 documents about the case at the request of the commission. But the report says those documents do not answer questions regarding the DOJ’s internal deliberations about the case.

The commission has spent more than $170,000 investigating the DOJ’s decisions in the New Black Panther Party case. Congressional Republicans have applauded the panel’s investigation, and some conservative commissioners have endorsed a continuance of the probe.

In late October, the commission subpoenaed key DOJ officials who were involved with the case. But the DOJ would not allow testimony from former acting Civil Rights Division Assistant Attorney General Loretta King, or division officials Julie Fernandes and Steve Rosenbaum, citing the commission’s terms for the depositions. The DOJ also declined to abide by a subpoena for testimony from Deputy Associate Attorney General Sam Hirsch, who has ties to the case.

Democratic Commissioner Michael Yaki said last week that the commission’s probe “is not legitimate” and “an irresponsible exercise.” He and Democratic Commissioner Arlan Melendez did not side with their conservative colleagues in the body’s 5-2 vote on Friday in favor of the New Black Panther report.

Friday, November 19th, 2010

The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights on Friday endorsed a disparaging report on the Justice Department’s management of a divisive voter-intimidation case against members of the New Black Panther Party.

The body voted 5-2 along ideological lines to approve the conservative-backed document, three weeks after a Democratic commissioner walked out of a previous meeting, preventing consideration of the report. Republican Vice Chairman Abigail Thernstrom, who has voiced concerns about the commission’s investigation, was not present.

Democratic Commissioner Michael Yaki, who walked out of the last meeting, said the commission’s investigation “is not legitimate” and “an irresponsible exercise.” He said the report is “blown out of proportion.”

“It really reads like a bad script for a ‘Men in Black’ sequel,” Yaki said. “It has conspiracy theories, whispers of left-wing cabals, sinister forces at work tampering with witnesses, innuendo and rumor.”

U.S. Civil Rights Commissioner Peter Kirsanow (photo by Andrew Ramonas / Main Justice)

Republican Commissioner Peter Kirsanow conceded that the New Black Panther case alone “may not be the most important thing in the world.” But he said the commission’s probe was important. He noted that former DOJ staffer J. Christian Adams and Assistant U.S. Attorney Christopher Coates, the former chief of the Civil Rights Division Voting Section, testified before the commission that DOJ officials were opposed to opening voting rights cases against minorities.

“What drew the attention of this particular commission was [the New Black Panther case] appeared to be, and is now confirmed by these two witnesses to be, a manifestation of a policy and practice engaged in by the Department of Justice,” Kirsanow said.

Assistant Attorney General Thomas Perez said in a statement before the commission that the Civil Rights Division is “strongly committed” to enforcing voting rights laws, pushing back against commissioners’ criticism of  DOJ decisions in the case.

An earlier draft of the commission’s report says the DOJ did not fully cooperate with the probe, which focused on the government’s decision to throw out most charges against members of the anti-white fringe group who wore military clothing outside a polling place in a black Philadelphia neighborhood in November 2008. The version of the report approved by the commission also is critical of DOJ cooperation’s with the investigation, according to Republican and independent commissioners. The document will not become public for a few days.

The DOJ has voiced opposition to the earlier report’s allegations about the department’s responsiveness. DOJ spokeswoman Tracy Schmaler said last month that the department has handed over more than 4,000 documents about the case at the request of the commission.

The commission has spent more than $170,000 probing the DOJ’s handling of the New Black Panther Party case. Congressional Republicans have commended the panel’s investigation, and some conservative commissioners have supported continuing the probe.

In late October, the panel subpoenaed key DOJ officials who were  involved with the case. But the DOJ would not permit testimony from former acting Civil Rights Division Assistant Attorney General Loretta King, or division officials Julie Fernandes and Steve Rosenbaum, citing the commission’s conditions for the depositions. The DOJ also declined to comply with a subpoena for testimony from Deputy Associate Attorney General Sam Hirsch, who has ties to the case.

This story has been updated.

Thursday, November 4th, 2010

The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights will not hold a meeting Friday to consider a draft report that blasts the Justice Department’s handling of a controversial voter-intimidation case against members of the New Black Panther Party.

The panel is slated to meet again on Nov. 19, commission spokeswoman Lenore Ostrowsky told Main Justice Thursday. But the commission has not confirmed whether it plans to vote on the draft report at that meeting, the spokeswoman said. Ostrowsky said she wasn’t told why the meeting was canceled.

The conservative-led commission attempted last week to vote on the report, which alleges the DOJ did not fully cooperate with the body’s investigation into the government’s decision to dismiss most charges against members of the anti-white fringe group who wore military clothing as they stood outside a polling place in a black neighborhood in Philadelphia in November 2008. But Democratic Commissioner Michael Yaki, who would have made quorum, left the meeting room in protest before the body could vote on the report.

The body’s $173,653 investigation has received praise from Republicans, who have expressed concern about the DOJ’s decisions in the case.

Friday, October 29th, 2010

The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights on Friday postponed a vote on a draft report that blasts the Justice Department’s handling of a controversial voter-intimidation case against members of the New Black Panther Party after a Democrat thwarted the vote in protest.

Democratic Commissioner Michael Yaki, who would have made quorum, left the meeting room before the body could vote on the document. The report says the DOJ did not fully cooperate with the commission’s investigation into the government’s decision to dismiss most charges against members of the anti-white fringe group who wore military clothing as they stood outside a polling place in a black neighborhood in Philadelphia in November 2008. The panel postponed the vote on the report to next Friday.

Michael Yaki, a Democrat on the U.S. Civil Rights Commission (photo by Andrew Ramonas / Main Justice)

“This process for this entire investigation has been a farce from the beginning and done in a way to diminish the opportunity of those who oppose this investigation to participate,” Yaki told reporters outside the meeting room.

Commissioner Arlan Melendez, a Democrat, and Vice Chairman Abigail Thernstrom, a Republican, who both have concerns about the body’s investigation, were unable to attend the meeting, which he said was called on short notice. The Democratic commissioner said “their voices deserve to be heard.”

Chairman Gerald Reynolds, a Republican, told reporters after the meeting that no one tried to keep the commissioners from attending the meeting.

“There was no game playing here,” Reynolds said.

The draft report, obtained by Talking Points Memo, says the DOJ did not adequately address “serious accusations” made by former DOJ staffer J. Christian Adams and Assistant U.S. Attorney Christopher Coates, the former chief of the Civil Rights Division Voting Section, about hostility in the DOJ to prosecuting voting rights cases against minorities. Adams and Coates were told by the DOJ not to appear before the commission.

DOJ spokeswoman Tracy Schmaler told Main Justice on Thursday that she “strongly” disagrees with the report’s claims about the DOJ’s responsiveness. She said the DOJ has handed over more than 4,000 documents about the case at the request of the commission.

Schmaler also noted that Assistant Attorney General Thomas Perez testified about the case before the commission. He defended decisions made in the case in his testimony earlier this year.

The report cites The Weekly Standard, a conservative magazine, as the source of many of its findings. The commission’s $173,653 investigation has received praise from Republicans, who have expressed concern about the DOJ’s decisions in the case.

Commissioner Peter Kirsanow, a Republican, said the commission should discuss keeping its probe open on an “indefinite” basis because the body is still waiting for more information from the DOJ. David Blackwood, the commission’s general counsel, said the body will subpoena former acting Civil Rights Division Assistant Attorney General Loretta King and her former deputy, Sam Hirsch, in addition to division officials Julie Fernandes and Steve Rosenbaum, who are key figures involved with the New Black Panther Party case.

“I understand that the Department of Justice did agree to at least receive our next set of subpoenas,” said Commissioner Todd F. Gaziano, an Independent. “That’s a good thing. I hope they actually stop instructing their employees not to [testify].”

Thursday, October 28th, 2010

The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights is set to vote Friday on a report highly critical of the Justice Department’s handling of a controversial voter-intimidation case against members of the New Black Panther Party, Talking Points Memo reported Thursday.

The draft version of the report says the DOJ did not fully cooperate with the commission’s investigation into the government’s decision to dismiss most charges against members of the anti-white fringe group who wore military clothing as they stood outside a polling place in a black neighborhood in Philadelphia in November 2008. The document says the DOJ did not thoroughly address “serious accusations” made by former DOJ staffer J. Christian Adams and Assistant U.S. Attorney Christopher Coates, the former chief of the Civil Rights Division Voting Section, about hostility in the DOJ to prosecuting voting rights cases against minorities.

“[T]he record of communications within the Department appears to indicate that senior political appointees played a significant role in the decision making surrounding the lawsuit,” the report says. “The involvement of senior DOJ officials by itself would not be unusual, but the Department’s repeated attempts to obscure the nature of their involvement and other refusals to cooperate raise questions about what the Department is trying to hide.”

DOJ spokeswoman Tracy Schmaler told Main Justice that she “strongly” disagrees with the report’s claims about the DOJ’s responsiveness. She said the DOJ has turned over more than 4,000 documents regarding the case at the request of the commission.

Schmaler also noted that Assistant Attorney General Thomas Perez testified about the case before commission. He defended decisions made in the case in his testimony earlier this year.

The report cites The Weekly Standard, a conservative magazine, as the source of many of its findings. The commission’s $173,653 investigation has been applauded by Republicans, who have expressed concern about the DOJ’s decisions in the case.

Monday, October 25th, 2010

The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights spent $173,653 in its investigation into the Justice Department’s handling of a controversial voter intimidation case against members of the New Black Panther Party, Talking Points Memo reported Monday.

The commission held several hearings over the last year regarding the DOJ’s decision to dismiss most of the charges against members of the anti-white fringe group who stood outside a majority-black polling place wearing military clothing in November 2008. The hearings included testimony this year from key DOJ officials including Assistant Attorney General Thomas Perez, former DOJ prosecutor J. Christian Adams and Assistant U.S. Attorney Christopher Coates, the former chief of the Civil Rights Division Voting Section.

Perez defended the decision made in the case during his testimony before the commission. But Coates, who testified against DOJ orders, and Adams blasted the handling of the case.

The commission will meet Friday to approve its New Black Panther enforcement report, which is expected to be critical of the DOJ, according to TPM. The investigation has been applauded by Republicans, who have expressed concern about the DOJ’s decisions in the case.

Friday, September 24th, 2010

A federal prosecutor who urged pursuing a controversial voter intimidation case against members of the New Black Panther Party defied Justice Department orders not to appear on Friday before a federal commission.

Christopher Coates, who was chief of the Civil Rights Division Voting Section, told members of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights that Assistant Attorney General Thomas Perez and other DOJ officials gave inaccurate statements on the handling of the case, which involved members of an anti-white fringe group who stood outside a majority-black polling place wearing military clothing in November 2008.

The prosecutor said the Civil Rights Division, led by then-acting Assistant Attorney General Loretta King, was opposed to the enforcement of voting rights laws when there was suspected discrimination against whites. Coates said the decisions made on the New Black Panthers case led to a “travesty on justice.”

Christopher Coates (photo by Andrew Ramonas / Main Justice)

“Quite simply, if incorrect representations are going to successfully thwart inquiry into the systemic problems regarding race-neutral enforcement of the Voting Rights Act by the Civil Rights Division – problems that were manifested in the DOJ’s disposition of the New Black Panther Party case – that end is not going to be furthered or accomplished by my sitting silently by at the direction of my supervisors while incorrect information is provided,” said Coates, who is now at the South Carolina U.S. Attorney’s Office. “I do not believe that I am professionally, ethically, legally, much less, morally bound to allow such a result to occur.”

The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights subpoenaed Coates and former DOJ trial attorney J. Christian Adams as part of its investigation into the DOJ’s handling of the New Black Panthers case. The DOJ said it would not allow Coates or Adams to appear before the commission, citing a longstanding policy that prevents frontline attorneys from testifying. Adams, who resigned earlier this year over the case, testified before the commission in July, saying the DOJ purposely passed up cases against blacks suspected of voting rights infractions.

Director Joseph H. Hunt of the DOJ Civil Division Federal Programs branch wrote in a letter to commission general counsel David Blackwood that Coates is not “an appropriate witness” to testify about current DOJ decision making. Perez was the only DOJ official who was allowed to appear before the commission.

Perez, who was not at the DOJ during the final disposition of the case, defended the handling of the case in May when he testified before the commission.

“This is a case about career people disagreeing with career people,” Perez said in May. He added that it show the “robust interaction” that is an element of the typical daily life of the Justice Department.

DOJ Inspector General Glenn Fine said earlier this month that his office will examine how the Civil Rights Division enforces voting rights laws, after Republican Reps. Lamar Smith of Texas and Frank Wolf of Virginia expressed concern about the handling of the New Black Panthers case. Fine, however, said he would look at the Voting Section’s enforcement of laws “over time,” suggesting his probe would also examine allegations of politicization during the George W. Bush administration.

At the hearing Friday, Coates said there was “widespread” opposition in the DOJ to his successful 2005 prosecution of a black Democratic Party official in Noxubee County, Miss., which was the first time a case was filed under the Voting Rights Act for discrimination against white voters.

“In my opinion, this disposition of the Panther case was ordered because the people calling the shots in May 2009 were angry at the filing of the [2005] case and angry at the filing of the Panther case,” Coates said. “That anger was the result of their deep-seated opposition to the equal enforcement of the Voting Rights Act against racial minorities and for the protection of white voters, who have been discriminated against.”

The prosecutor said he asked to transfer to South Carolina for an 18-month assignment in late 2009, after “considerable conflict” between himself and Civil Rights Division officials, including King and her deputy, Steve Rosenbaum. He said he became Voting Section “chief only in name” by fall 2009.

“If Senator [John] McCain had won the election and … his people let me in as chief of the Voting Section and there had been good relations between us, then I would have stayed on as chief of the Voting Section awhile longer,” Coates said.

UPDATED:

In an e-mailed statement, Justice Department spokeswoman Tracy Schmaler called the commission’s investigation “thin on facts and evidence and thick on rhetoric.” She also noted a Justice Department Inspector General’s report, which found the Civil Rights Division during the previous administration was overly politicized

Her full statement is embedded below.

“As even one Republican member of the commission has acknowledged, this so-called investigation is thin on facts and evidence and thick on rhetoric.

The Department makes enforcement decisions based on the merits, not the race, gender or ethnicity of any party involved. We are committed to comprehensive and vigorous enforcement of the federal laws that prohibit voter intimidation. We continue to work with voters, communities, and local law enforcement to ensure that Americans can vote free from intimidation, coercion or threats.

Let’s not forget the context in which these allegations are being made.  The politicization that occurred in the Civil Rights Division in the previous administration has been well documented by the Inspector General, and it was a disgrace to the great history of the division. We have changed that. We have reinvigorated the Civil Rights Division and ensured that it is actively enforcing the American people’s civil rights, and it is clear that not everyone supports that. We are committed to enforcing our nation’s civil rights laws, and we are going to continue to do so without respect to politics.”

Friday, July 2nd, 2010

Former Civil Rights Division lawyer J. Christian Adams has escalated his war with the Department of Justice, giving a two-part interview to Fox News asserting that racial motivations were behind dismissal of a voter intimidation case against members of the New Black Panther Party.

J. Christian Adams on Fox News (Fox News).

And for the first time, the Justice Department has criticized J. Christian Adams‘ own motivations on the record.

The November 2008 incident at a Philadelphia polling place has become a cause celebre for conservatives. Two members of the anti-white fringe group stood outside the polling place in military-style garb, one of them holding a night stick.

The Obama DOJ dismissed the case last year, citing a lack of a pattern of intimidation and the fact that one of the Black Panthers was a registered Democratic poll watcher. The DOJ obtained an injunction against the Black Panther who carried the nightstick.

“You’re supposed to be able to go vote without somebody with a weapon shouting racist slurs at you,” Adams said in his first Fox News interview on Wednesday. “They said, ‘You’re about to be ruled by the black man, Cracker.’ They called people ‘white devils.’ They tried to stop people from entering the polls.”

In fact, no voters at all in the Philadelphia precinct have come forward to allege intimidation. The complaints have come from white Republican poll watchers, who have given no evidence they were registered to vote in the majority black precinct.

An Associated Press story inaccurately described the scene as one where white voters were being intimidated by the Black Panther members. The only white people at the scene that day appeared to be the Republican poll watchers. And Fox News host Megyn Kelly inaccurately described video taken of the incident as made by a “voter.” In fact, the video was made by Stephen Robert Morse, a blogger hired by the local Republican Party on behalf of the John McCain presidential campaign.

The Philadelphia video also did not capture any racial slurs, although the two Black Panthers were shown in an earlier National Geographic documentary using derogatory terms against whites. The Southern Poverty Law Center has classified the New Black Panther Party as a hate group.

“It is not uncommon for attorneys within the department to have good faith disagreements about the appropriate course of action in a particular case, although it is regrettable when a former department attorney distorts the facts and makes baseless allegations to promote his or her agenda,” Justice Department spokeswoman Tracy Schmaler told Fox News in a written statement.

Described as a DOJ “whistleblower” by Fox News host Kelly, Adams was hired as a career lawyer under an improperly politicized process during the Bush administration.  Adams quit the Justice Department June 4, after officials banned him from testifying before the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights about the handling of the case.

Asked by Kelly if he thought the DOJ is corrupt, Adams said: “I don’t think the department or the fine people who work there are corrupt.” But he said the decision to dismiss the case was corrupt, and accused the DOJ of having a policy of not pursuing cases where blacks intimidate white voters.

As Main Justice has previously reported, Adams was hired in 2005 by Bradley Schlozman, a Bush-era political appointee who hired “right-thinking Americans” with conservative affiliations in a process the Department of Justice Inspector General concluded was improperly politicized.

Adams has also written a piece for the American Spectator that likened President Barack Obama’s world view to that of Nazi appeasers and argued on a conservative blogging network that health care reform is a threat to liberty.

Adams is making his case in a variety of media outlets. In the past few weeks, he’s written an editorial in The Washington Times, wrote a post for and been interviewed by Pajamas Media, and was featured in segments on Fox News on Wednesday and Thursday.

Adams also said on Fox News that one of the lawyers who made the decision not to pursue the case further, Steve Rosenbaum, did not read the case materials before making his decision. “It was so derelict and so corrupt, that Chris Coates actually threw the memo” at Rosenbaum, Adams said, referring to the former Voting Section chief, who has since been reassigned by the DOJ to South Carolina.

Adams said he wasn’t at the meeting but was told that it took place.

Parts one and two of Adams’ interview are embedded below. Additional reporting by Ryan J. Reilly.

Thursday, June 24th, 2010

The former Civil Rights Division lawyer who quit the Justice Department after he was denied permission to speak about his work on a controversial voter intimidation case will testify before the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights next month.

J. Christian Adams at a Federalist Society meeting in Washington in November (Photo by Ryan J. Reilly / Main Justice).

J. Christian Adams, the lead attorney on a voter intimidation case against members of the New Black Panther Party in Philadelphia, resigned from the Justice Department on June 4.

Adams’ lawyer said earlier this month that his client planned to cooperate with the commission.

The conservative-controlled commission chose July 6 over the objection of the panel’s two Democratic commissioners, who said they will not be able to attend.

Spokeswoman Lenore Ostrowsky said that the commission is “not privy to any communications between the Department of Justice and Mr. Adams” and did not know if there were still any restrictions on what he was allowed to say in his testimony.

A Justice Department spokeswoman did not immediately reply to request for comment on restrictions the DOJ might seek on Adams’ testimony.

“To me the question is whether this is the commissions show or the Adams show,” Commissioner Michael Yaki, one of the Democratic board members who opposed the July 6 hearing, said in an interview. “These folks are desperate to create news items.”

A little over a week after he left the Justice Department, Adams started his own website, ElectionLawCenter.com with the slogan “more red than the ivory tower.” He has used the forum to criticize the Voting Section’s work and highlight lawsuits against Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act, which he wrote “is on the outer frontier of the permissible exercise of federal power over the states.”

Adams has not discussed the New Black Panther Party case on the website.