Posts Tagged ‘U.S. Marshals Service’
Sunday, March 13th, 2011

A funeral service on Sunday was held in St. Louis for Deputy U.S. Marshal John Perry, who died this week from wounds he obtained during a shootout with a man he tried to arrest.

Deputy U.S. Marshal Theodore Abegg and a task force officer from the St. Louis police department were wounded during the shooting. Boles, who was wanted on a state warrant for assaulting a police officer and possessing a controlled substance, was killed.

The U.S. Marshals Service promoted Perry, 48, to Protective Intelligence Investigator after his death. He had been a fugitive task force team leader and firearms instructor for the U.S. Marshals Service in the Eastern District of Missouri since coming to St. Louis in 2005.

Perry previously served at the D.C. Superior Court for the U.S. Marshals Service after graduating from the U.S. Marshals Academy in 2001. He also was a call-center volunteer for the television show America’s Most Wanted during his time in D.C.

He worked for the Madison County Probation Office in Edwardsville, Ill., for 16 years prior to joining the U.S. Marshals Service. Perry graduated from Southern Illinois University – Edwardsville in 1984.

Perry is the son of a bankruptcy court judge and grandson of a U.S. District Court judge in Chicago.

Perry is the second Deputy U.S. Marshal this year to be killed in a shooting.

Deputy U.S. Marshal Derek Hotsinpiller was killed in Elkins, W.Va., on Feb. 16 when he attempted to serve a warrant on Charles E. Smith. Smith, who was wanted on drug charges, was also killed. Supervisory Agent Alex Neville and Deputy U.S. Marshal Fred Frederick were wounded in the shooting.

Monday, January 3rd, 2011

Stacia Hylton on Friday was sworn in as the first woman to serve as U.S. Marshals Service Director.

Stacia Hylton (photo by Andrew Ramonas / Main Justice)

Hylton, whom the Senate confirmed on Dec. 22, previously ran the Virginia-based firm Hylton Kirk & Associates, which did consulting in the prison industry. She faced criticism from prison and human rights watchdog organizations that claimed her work as a consultant would present a conflict of interest if she became the U.S. Marshals Service Director. Hylton said at her November nomination hearing that her past work would not pose a conflict of interest.

The Director also worked in the U.S. Marshals Service from 1980 to 2004. Hylton held various leadership posts in the U.S. Marshals Service, including acting Deputy Director. She then served as the Federal Detention Trustee from 2004 to 2010.

Hylton replaced John Clark, whom President George W. Bush appointed in 2006. She is the 10th Director of the U.S. Marshals Service, which is a branch of the Justice Department.

“The Marshals Service has a rich and proud history and it is an honor to return to the agency and lead the men and women of this great organization,” Hylton said in a statement.  “Like many law enforcement agencies, we face significant challenges, but I am confident the agency will continue to excel in the execution of our missions and work with our fellow law enforcement partners in securing our country.”

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Thursday, December 23rd, 2010

The Senate confirmed Stacia Hylton on Wednesday as the next head of the U.S. Marshals Service by unanimous consent.

Stacia Hylton (photo by Andrew Ramonas / Main Justice)

President Barack Obama nominated to Hylton for the post on Sept. 20. The Senate Judiciary Committee endorsed her by voice vote on Dec. 1.

Hylton had faced criticism from prison and human rights watchdog organizations that claimed her work earlier this year as a consultant in the prison industry would present a conflict of interest if she became the U.S. Marshals Service Director. The GEO Group Inc., which contracted with her Virginia-based firm, Hylton Kirk & Associates, paid her $112,500 in consulting fees.

She said at her November nomination hearing that her past work would not pose a conflict of interest. The White House said she wouldn’t need a waiver from the President’s ethics rules, which prohibit appointees for two years from handling issues with recent clients.

Hylton previously worked for the U.S. Marshals Service from 1980 to 2004. She held various leadership posts in the U.S. Marshals Service, including acting Deputy Director. Hylton also served as the Federal Detention Trustee from 2004 to 2010. Read more about Hylton here.

She will replace John Clark, whom President George W. Bush appointed in 2006.

Attorney General Eric Holder said in a statement, “I am pleased that Stacia Hylton will return to the U.S. Marshals Service to build upon 29 years of distinguished service at the department.”

Thursday, November 11th, 2010

Prison and human rights watchdog organizations blasted the nominee to lead the U.S. Marshals Service, claiming her prior work as a consultant in the prison industry would present a conflict of interest if she is confirmed, The Washington Times reported Wednesday.

The groups said they oppose U.S. Marshals Service Director nominee Stacia Hylton because of the time she spent earlier this year as consultant for GEO Group, one of the biggest private prison businesses. The company receives millions of dollars from U.S. Marshals contracts.

“It is extremely worrisome that Ms. Hylton is nominated for a position where she would be directly involved with overseeing contracts with private prison companies to house federal detainees, given her cozy relationship with the private prison industry and her acceptance of more than $100,000 from GEO through her consulting work,” Ken Kopczynski, director of Private Corrections Working Group, a non-profit organization that opposes prison privatization, said in a statement.

Hylton received $112,500 in consulting fees from The GEO Group Inc., which contracted with her Virginia-based firm, Hylton Kirk & Associates. But the White House said she won’t need a waiver from President Barack Obama’s ethics rules, which prohibit appointees for two years from handling issues with recent clients.

“After review, it was determined … she could easily be recused from participating in particular matters in which that client was a party,” a White House official told The Washington Times. “This recusal, along with the Obama administration’s ethics pledge and other ethics restrictions, will ensure that she can serve ably and effectively as director of the U.S. Marshals Service.”

Hylton, who worked for the U.S. Marshals service from 1980 to 2004, received praise from the National Sheriffs’ Association. Sheriff B.J. Roberts, the group’s president, and Aaron D. Kennard, the executive director, wrote in a letter to the Senate Judiciary Committee that Hylton has “extraordinary qualifications, experience and expertise.”

Hylton held various leadership posts in the U.S. Marshals Service, including Acting Deputy Director. She also served as the Federal Detention Trustee from 2004 to 2010. Hylton, who was nominated Sept. 20, would replace John Clark, who President George W. Bush appointed in 2006.

Hylton and Drug Enforcement Administration Administrator nominee Michele Leonhart, who also faces opposition, will go before the Senate Judiciary Committee for a hearing on Wednesday. Organizations that support the legalization of marijuana have criticized Leonhart for her efforts to enforce pot laws.

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Wednesday, November 10th, 2010

The Senate Judiciary Committee next week will hold a hearing for two Justice Department nominees, including one who was nominated more than nine months ago.

Michele Leonhart and Eric Holder (DOJ)

The panel will hear testimony on Nov. 17 from acting Drug Enforcement Administration chief Michele Leonhart, who became the presidential nominee for the agency’s top job on Feb. 2., and former U.S. Marshals Service official Stacia Hylton, who was tapped on Sept. 20 to lead that DOJ agency.

Organizations that favor the legalization of marijuana have pushed for the withdrawal or rejection of Leonhart’s nomination, the National Journal reported. They said the acting Administrator, who has lead the agency since November 2007, has targeted medical marijuana growers whose prosecutions are not a priority in the DOJ under Attorney General Eric Holder.

A DEA spokesman directed a request for comment from Main Justice to the White House. A White House spokesman didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.

The groups’ complaints don’t appear to be the source of delays on Leonhart’s nomination. Committee staffers told the National Journal that pro-marijuana advocates’ concerns haven’t really crossed the mind of senators on the panel. The aides said the delays were the result of committee work on judicial nominees, including the nomination hearing for Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan.

This story has been updated.

Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010

A man who impersonated a U.S. Marshal and his wife pleaded guilty to federal charges stemming from an attempt to deport his cousin’s pregnant wife in San Diego, the Associated Press reported Wednesday.

Gregory Denny and his wife, Karen, were charged with impersonation to make an arrest and aiding and abetting the false impersonation of a law enforcement officer. They face up to three years in prison.

In January, the Dennys went to the relative’s home in Hemet, Calif., to falsely deport the woman for entering the United States illegally, according to court documents. Denny put handcuffs on the cousin’s wife and drove her to a U.S. border patrol station in California.

The man told border patrol agents that he was a U.S. Marshal and asked them to take the woman into custody. The agents refused the request.

The Dennys then brought the cousin’s wife to the San Diego Airport, where she would take a flight to the Philippines. The man showed fake credentials to airport authorities and told them he was a U.S. Marshal, who needed to transport a prisoner. Transportation Security Administration officials allowed him to proceed.

Prosecutors wouldn’t say whether the woman returned to the United States.

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Wednesday, October 27th, 2010

Federal prosecutors, law enforcement officers and other government employees on Wednesday took center stage at DAR Constitution Hall in Washington as the Justice Department honored some of its own and the work of others.

Attorney General Eric Holder paid tribute to about 350 government workers at the 58th Annual Attorney General Awards Ceremony for their contributions to the DOJ. Grinning honorees floated across the stage for about 90 minutes to receive more than 25 different awards and share the spotlight and a picture with Holder and about 40 top DOJ officials, while hundreds of family members, friends and colleagues looked on.

Attorney General Eric Holder (photo by Daniel Hoffman / Main Justice)

“Although the Department of Justice includes some of our nation’s most talented and most effective public servants, each of today’s awardees has stood out,” Holder said. “Not only is their service to our nation inspiring, it is strengthening the work of the Justice Department at every level and making a powerful difference for people across our country, and far beyond.”

The DOJ’s top honor, the Attorney General’s Award for Exceptional Service, went to the more than a dozen DOJ and other federal employees, who worked on the Pfizer Inc. off-label promotion and kickbacks case, which led to the biggest health care settlement in DOJ history. The Attorney General’s Award for Exceptional Service also went to about 60 federal prosecutors and law enforcement officials, who handled the 2009 New York subway bombing plot case against Najibullah Zazi, among other suspects.

The department also paid tribute to Drug Enforcement Administration agents who died in Afghanistan in October 2009. Special agents Forrest N. Leamon, Chad L. Michael and Michael E. Weston were killed when their helicopter was shot down following a raid on poppy fields in western Afghanistan. The DEA has been working to stop the nation’s opium trade, which helps fund the Taliban.

Members of their families accepted the awards on their behalf as audience members gave them a standing ovation.

Holder, who keeps photos of the men on his desk, saw the agents’ remains arrive at Delaware’s Dover Air Force Base. The Attorney General told Newsweek last December that seeing the caskets was “the most difficult evening” so far in his tenure. He said on Wednesday that the men were “true American heroes.”

The Attorney General also bestowed honors to four of his colleagues, who have worked at the DOJ for decades.

Former Deputy Assistant Attorney General John “Jack” Keeney was honored with the new Claudia J. Flynn Award for Professional Responsibility for his 59 years of service at the DOJ. (He actually received the award during a farewell ceremony last month.)

Deputy Assistant Attorney General Michael Hertz of the Commercial Litigation Branch, a 33-year veteran of the DOJ, was the recipient of the Edward H. Levi Award for Outstanding Professionalism and Exemplary Integrity for his work on False Claims Act cases and the Attorney General’s Award for Distinguished Service for his work on the $1.4 billion Cobell settlement in 2009, which involves American Indian trust assets.  He was the only honoree to receive two awards this year.

William L. Taylor, Judicial Security Inspector for the Southern District of Ohio of the U.S. Marshals Service, received the Mary C. Lawton Lifetime Service Award for responding to major challenges — including the Oklahoma City bombing and Hurricane Katrina — over his past 20 years at the DOJ.

Kevin Ohlson, Holder’s chief of staff and 20-year DOJ veteran, was the recipient of the Attorney General’s Award for Distinguished Service for his role in advancing DOJ programs.

Read about all of the award winners here.

Friday, October 15th, 2010

An U.S. Marshals Service official in the Southern District of New York was sentenced to almost four years in prison for giving one of his guns to a convicted felon and committing perjury, the New Jersey U.S. Attorney announced Thursday.

Deputy U.S. Marshal Antoine Dobson gave his off-duty firearm to Larry Langforddavis and provided false statements to a federal grand jury investigating the crime.

Dobson received a 45-month prison sentence, in addition to three years of supervised release.

Tuesday, October 12th, 2010

Sno Rush (Facebook)

A former U.S. Marshals Service employee on Tuesday pleaded guilty in federal court in D.C. to filching $104,000 from the government, a Justice Department official announced.

Sno H. Rush, a former U.S. Marshals administrative officer in the D.C.  Superior Court from 2002 to 2008, admitted to making personal purchases with a U.S. Marshals credit card, creating a fake employee to secure fraudulent paychecks for herself and using U.S. Treasury checks to pay off her credit card debt.

She was charged with one count of government property theft. Rush could face up to five years in prison and a $250,000 fine.

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Friday, September 17th, 2010

President Barack Obama on Friday announced his intention to nominate a former member of the U.S. Marshals Service to be the director of that Justice Department agency.

Stacia Hylton, who worked for the U.S. Marshals service from 1980 to 2004, would replace John Clark, who was appointed by President George W. Bush in 2006. She held various leadership posts in the U.S. Marshals Service, including Acting Deputy Director. Hylton also served as the Federal Detention Trustee from 2004 to 2010.

She currently runs her own consulting company, Hylton Kirk & Associates. Read more about her here.

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